Monthly Archives: June 2016

GOOGLE LAUNCHES SPRINGBOARD SEARCH TOOL TO HELP USERS SEARCH ACROSS ITS SUITE OF APPS

app-indexing

Google recently introduced a new search tool on the platform known as Springboard. This tool is designed to conduct searches across Google’s collection of apps that includes Google Docs, Gmail, Google Drive, Google Calendar, Google Photos, etc.

Besides being a search assistant, Springboard also proactively provides pretty handy, actionable information and suggestions. No such examples are provided as to what those suggestions may be.

Springboard is specifically so designed to cater to business oriented people who make use of Google’s productivity apps on a regular basis; especially the high performance driven tech savvy individuals.

As part of the announcement, the company also issued a major upgrade to Google Sites, which is a tool designed by Google for creating pages on the web. The update will help users to conveniently fetch information from other Google apps and flaunt responsive design for all web layouts.

As per reports, Google’s currently testing both Springboard and the Google Sites upgrade with a select bunch of users in Google’s early adopter campaign. If you are looking forward to use this feature early then just fill out the form here before Google officially announces its public release date.

AMP ENABLED ADS OFFER BETTER VISIBILITY & HIGHER CTRS, REVEALS AN ONLINE STUDY

mobile-marketing

Google introduced AMP technology to content publishers promising that they would not only be able to sell and distribute their own ads on AMP enabled pages, but also keep the revenue generated from those ads.

When it comes to loading speed, AMP enabled pages are miles ahead of the non-AMP enabled pages, but it remains to be seen if they deliver on the revenue front as well. The study tracking the performance of ads on AMP enabled pages so far drew following conclusions.

“We compared ad performance on AMP and non-AMP mobile pages across 150 publishers (large corporations and small businesses in different geographic regions) on our programmatic platforms. The preliminary results are encouraging.”

The study observed that

  • Around 80% of advertising brands received higher viewership of their ads on an AMP enabled platform as compared to a non-AMP platform.
  • Almost 90% of advertising brands received higher CTRs on their ads through an AMP enabled platform as compared to a non-AMP platform.

As per the survey, advertising brands themselves vouch for the fact that AMP technology has played a significant role in driving greater results for their brands.

Let’s see what Conor Beck, representative from one of the advertising brands TownHall Media, has to say about the performance of their ads on AMP enabled pages.

“We’ve seen a 90% decrease in page latency, 96% decrease in unfilled impressions, 65% increase in ad engagement and 32% increase in eCPM. Perceived load time improved from approximately 17 seconds to 2–3 seconds.”

So far so good. However, it’s still too early to actually make a fair assessment of the performance of ads on AMP enabled pages. There’s still a lot to be done in terms of enhancing the quality of published content and audience experience, opines one of the AMP project representatives.

As far as the future of AMP pages is concerned, the company plans to introduce two new ad units. Sticky Ads, AMP ads and Flying Carpet Ads are some of the support forums that provide help related to advertising on an AMP enabled platform. More information pertaining to AMP page advertising will be made available to businesses in the near future.

USING HREFLANG DOESN’T HELP YOUR SEARCH RANKINGS, REVEALS GOOGLE’S JOHN MUELLER

seo-company

Businesses with multiple online presence tend to use hreflang as a markup on their websites to cater to users in their native language. This way businesses communicate to Google to show only the localized version of their website content in SERPs. For instance, if a business caters to both Spanish and French consumers then it tells Google to serve only co.es version to Google Espana users and only co.fr version to Google France audience.

But its use is limited to serve only that purpose. As Google’s John Mueller was quoted as saying, addition of hreflang as a feature won’t help your site climb the ladder in search ranking. But it helps in informing Google which URL is to be displayed, on the basis of the region or language based searches.

Let’s see what Google’s John Mueller revealed through a video session on Google+

“Kind of think if you didn’t have those local pages would the dot-com pages rank in the local search results? And if they would rank then we’d like to swap at the URLs out against the appropriate local versions. So if you have a website, I don’t know that, that’s targeting furniture and you have a UK website and it doesn’t show it all in in France for example, then just setting up at the href lang with completely new pages for France wouldn’t change anything because we wouldn’t have anything to swap out. It wouldn’t be that your UK page would be excessively ranking.

Another hand if you have liked for Germany and Austria where the content is German both the same and your pages for the country of Germany happened to rank in Austria then that would be something that we could swap out.”

With that said, it becomes quite evident that hreflang feature may not help businesses deal with their search ranking woes.

MOVING TO A KEYWORD-TLD WON’T BOOST YOUR SEARCH RANKINGS, REVEALS GOOGLE

seo

The latest buzz doing rounds in the SEO industry is that moving to Keyword-TLDs (top-level domains) can boost your search rankings. This means, if you’re planning to shift your existing domain name from say .com to .Live , .News, .Attorney or any other industry specific domain then it will lift your search rankings. According to some media reports, a lawyer reportedly used the formula with tremendous success when he decided to migrate from a .COM domain to a domain called .ATTORNEY.

Contrary to these reports, there’s a bunch of old school SEOs who believe that .COM domains are the only safe options. This affirms Google’s school of thought that businesses who still use generic TLDs aren’t at a disadvantage in the searches.

In fact, Google’s John Mueller took note of these reports and posted a reminder to businesses through his twitter handle saying:

Moreover, he gave instances through the official webmaster forum on how Google handles these new top level domains in search ranking algorithm. This, however, sparked off a series of debates between Google’s webmasters, with Gary Illyes responding through his twitter handle saying: 

To which, John Mueller replied through Google+ saying:


This time an agrument came from Danny Sullivan, co-founder of Search Engine Land who tweeted to John saying: 

John is yet to respond to that query. But frankly speaking, businesses willing to try this suggestion, can do so at their behest. However, this idea of changing domains or even URLs may do more harm than good and you’re more likely to see a drop than a hike in your existing search ranking.