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Tag Archives: stats

RIP TWITTER’S SHARE COUNTING BUTTON AND WELCOME OPENSHARECOUNT AVENUES

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Late last year, Twitter left many publishers and social media managers in a bit of frenzy by announcing that it will no longer support share counts on its handle. This left many users in a spot of bother wondering how to track their article’s shareability count. It does hurt when your article’s shareability count suddenly drops down to zero. Low shareability count puts a question mark on the credibility of your content and that in-turn affects the bottom-line of your business.

But many users did find a quick, suitable replacement to their problem, while some are still in search of a better alternative or praying to God that share count will be brought back. And then there are the others, who were left with no other option but to completely get rid-off it.

Many RIP messages are directed at the late Twitter button. But there are quite a few options which more or less do the job in similar capacity and are yet to be explored fully. Listed below are some of the better alternatives available to fill the huge void left by Twitter’s share button.

  • OpenShareCount: Currently this share counting tool is in heavy duty mode, since many sites are leveraging its services to track their Twitter share counts. Although, OpenShareCount comes with certain limitations in terms of data access. This is mainly because many sites relied heavily on Twitter’s platform to do the needful. Since, the site can only access share counts of past seven days of tweets, which get stored locally only to be added later to the counter to give you a fair idea about the number of shares that your tweet has garnered.
  • TwitCount: This tool comes as a huge relief for publishers who find themselves getting stuck in OpenShareCount and Twitter’s dashboard problems, as it provides them with exact information about their article’s share count.
  • NewShareCounts: Much like OpenShareCount, this tool’s API only tracks tweets for past seven days from the day you start tracking and the rest of your tweet data goes amiss.
  • Gnip: The fact that it’s a Twitter owned tool is reason enough for it to become the darling of many large publishers. This tool has an added advantage of providing details of unlimited tweet history alongside real-time information.
  • TrackMaven: This analytics tracking tool has recently added support for Twitter counts as well.
  • And if you’re a developer and wish to build your own tool then you can make use of Twitter’s REST API. But this will require you to build a tool that is not limited to a week-long share history.

Besides these, publishers can also leverage BuzzSumo to track the number of share counts of their content.

The above mentioned options are quite handy, but they come with certain limitations in terms of usage and the services they offer. All we can say is that these tools as such cannot replace Twitter’s official button, but they can be trusted to do the needful.

For more information, write to us at sales@ebrandz.com and let our professional reps assist you.

RECOGNIZING & RESOLVING TRAFFIC DROP

traffic-dropOpening Google Analytics and seeing the web traffic go down is a nightmare. However, panicking over the issue is not needed since websites and the methods of acquiring traffic, both have become more complex than ever. Finding out the source of the problem and resolving it can uplift the traffic again. Below are the major areas you should investigate when having such issues.

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Look Closely at Traffic Source Changes

When you first see a downfall in traffic, go to Acquisition > overview and recheck all the traffic sources. A downfall in Organic Search indicates SEO problems. If there’s a lot of referral traffic from various websites and social media and if it is currently down, then ensure the continuity of running ads and links.

Examine On-Page Elements

In these cut-throat times for high traffic, a slight change in the optimized title tag can drag a page or the whole website down in search rankings. Ensure that the title tag remains as it is and that the meta information is correct. Make sure that all inner pages are not marked as ‘nofollow’, otherwise Google bots will not be able to follow the links and it will cause a downfall in rankings. H1 & H2 are extremely crucial and only removing a target keyword can make your website miserable.

Google Webmaster Tools to your Rescue

Be on the alert mode, always! Because Google penalties do not come with warnings. So login to webmasters tools and check all messages.

If you see a downfall in the index section of the webmaster tool, it means that Google is not able to index your website due to some reason. Find out the problem!

Crawl errors – 404 annoys Google as much as the users. Too many 404 errors will not only make your website inferior to Google but also to the users. Maybe they will never come back! So check the issue and fix it ASAP.

Not setting up Robots.txt file properly will lead to major problems. Use tester tools to allow Google bots to crawl the right pages and sections of your website.

Recheck Page Redirects

For all your redirected pages ensure that 301s are still in place. Removed and broken 301 will direct all your traffic to a 404 Error page, and we all know that Google hates 404. Too many of them will compel it to penalize your site.

Conclusion

Above are some of the main things one can do when they see a downfall in traffic. However, there are still many other things like canonical tag issues and broken navigation links which cause websites to crash and affect the traffic. If your website is still failing to lift up after many attempts, write your specific problem to sales@ebrandz.com or call 1-888-545-0616 (Toll-Free) for assistance.